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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it seems bankers were a little too lax with their banrs. hsbc has agreed to pay a fine in the united states in connection with charges of money laundering. media reports say the fine will be the largest ever paid by a bank to u.s. authorities. hsbc admitted on tuesday its anti-money laundering measures had been inadequate. the bank agreed to pay the penalties to u.s. authorities including the justice department. the bank says it accepts responsibility for past mistakes and has beefed up its internal controls. in july, a u.s. senate report accused the bank of being involved in money transfers linked to drug deals originating in mexico. the report also said the bank settled money transactions with links to iran, a country under u.s. sanctions. >>> now, british authorities have arrested three british men. that's over their alleged connection to a rate-fixing scandal involving libor, the london interbank offered rate. the serious fraud office announced tuesday the first arrests in the case that has rocked the financial community. but officials gave no details other than the arrested men are bri
hsbc. the government says the british bank did business with drug lords and terrorists yet faces no criminal charges. brian ross reports. >> reporter: when the most ruthless of the mexican drug cartels wanted to hide their money, they went to hsbc. so did hamas and al qaeda, along with iran and other countries and the u.s. financial blacklist. all customers of a bank known well around the word. but given much less prominence in the announcement was a deferred prosecution agreement with hsbc, meaning there will be no prosecution of the bank or its top executives. despite more than a decade of dealing with criminals and terrorists. >> this is a very just, very real and very powerful result. >> you don't think the bank got off easy? >> no, and i don't think the bank thinks it got off easy. >> reporter: but with $38 billion in profits over just the last two years alone, hsbc can easily afford its $1.92 billion payment. >> this is a signal to other banks that if you do this kind of stuff, you'll get a parking ticket, you'll pay the fine and move on. >> reporter: since this summer, whe
. >> europe's biggest bank, you heard about this, hsbc agreed to pony up close to $2 billion to settle accusations of money laundering. the senate banking committee they found that hsbc in mexico shipped $7 billion in cash, mind you, across the border, maybe turned a blind eye to where the money came from, want you to listen to neil barofsky, we had him on the show yesterday, and i asked him whether top bank officials knew they were handling drug money there. >> the notion that this wasn't something that was known on senior levels of the banks, at least they had plenty of reason to suspect that this was ongoing and, look, i think somebody described it as the biggest slap on the wrist in the history of banking fines. >> stuart gulliver receiving the big wrist slap in terms of bank fines. told me 2 billion bucks, that was chump change and it shows that crime pays. what do you think? >> i think any big bank, anybody in charge of the bank, bears responsibility for the conduct of the bank. hsbc is a famously tightly run bank. obviously the people at the top had to know something was amiss.
's biggest bank, hsbc, bank santander and international finance corporation are among them. it is layer for a japanese bank to lead such a large, financial deal especially when there isn't any local corporate or government involvement. this project could mark a milestone for japanese banks in their attempt to create a bigger presence in the global market. the plant will be built by braskan and mexico's group odessa. it's due to start operations by 2015. that's all from nikkei business report. back to you, kelly. >> thanks very much for that. >>> now, plans for the london and moscow listings suffered a blow this year when goldman sachs withdrew as a lead individualser on the ipo of alleged corporate governance issues. in a cnbc global exclusive, geoff cutmore asked alisher usmanov if events in october hurt his relationships. >> translator: i have always respected lloyd blankfein. goldman sachs is a company with which we are working with, the company that i control is working with. that is to say, i believe we will continue to work with gold pan sacks in the future. there is no doubt in m
more competitive. according to hsbc in 2000 mexican workers earned nearly five times the salary of their chinese peers. but by 2011, mexican workers were only about a third more expensive than chinese workers. when you project all these advantages into the next few years, mexico's economic future looks robust. the national intelligence council released an important report called "global trends 2030" one trend it looks at is how demographic changes will shape the world. countries with younger, more dynamic populations will grow faster. while the median age in mexico will be 30, 40, japan's median age will hit 52. america actually has an advantage here at 39. our median age will only be five years older than that of mexico's. trends don't ensure particular outcome, but it's clear that contrary to its global image, mexico's economy has momentum. it will be among the world's top ten economies by the end of this decade. smart reforms can build it further. the irony is that one possible impediment to mexico's growth could be the very country that is its biggest asset, the united state
is hsbc, apparently avoiding a criminal indictment but only because filing criminal charges could have destabilized the world's financial system. instead, the bank pay a record penalty. nearly $2 billion this that settlement, and as rick was just mentioning, the bank is facing a slew of accusations including that it transferred funds to mexican drug cartels and also transferred funds to nations like iran, evading international sanctions. charlie gasparino has more from the fox business network. charlie, is this unique only to hsbc, or is in the first domino to fall here? >> well, i mean, there may be other banks, but it follows a pattern that the justice department has used since arthur anderson following the enron scandal. they didn't want to put any more big companies out of business, so they go into these deferred prosecution agreements, today hit the bank with a big fine and then today kind of move on. what's kind of like -- what's not good about this is that if you think about it, shareholders are suffering when you had probably individual employees who committed possible crimes h
to pursue criminal charges against hsbc. the bank admits laundering money from iran, libya and myanmar. chuck grassley calls the lack of charges a declaration that "crime does pay." the justice department did not comment but defends its nearly $2 billion settlement with the bank. >>> two massachusetts costco workers are splitting a $50 million powerball prize. rosa deleon buys two tickets every day and shares them with her co-worker reginald. on wednesday the tickets finally paid off. the two will each get $11 million after taxes. congratulations to them. very lucky. >>> there is a machine that could one day be used to make homemade guns, not only that, it could make plastic guns that a metal detector won't find. you can believe some people are worried about it. here is joe johns with more. >> reporter: in the this northern virginia gun store you can buy all sorts of weapons but what if you could make weapons in your own home using a three-dimensional printer. sounds like science fiction but to some it's not far-fetched. >> primarily 3-d printers are used to manufacture parts for antiq
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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